Vaccination Protocols

CANINE VACCINATION PROTOCOL

You should have your new pet examined by a licensed veterinarian as soon as he/she joins your family. On your first visit, the veterinarian will discuss the vaccinations and vaccination schedule, diet, heartworm and flea/tick prevention, obedience training, EVC, housebreaking and microchipping.

Vaccinations are a very important part of your pet’s life. Vaccines help to prevent potentially chronic or deadly illnesses.

Puppy Age
Vaccination Protocol
6-8 Weeks
Physical Exam
DHPP/combo vaccine
Fecal analysis
De-worming
Start flea prevention (8wks)
 
9-11 Weeks
Progress Exam
DHPP/combo vaccine
Fecal analysis
De-worming
Start heartworm prevention (8wks)
 
12-14 Weeks
Progress Exam
DHLPP/corona combo vaccine
Deworming
Bordetella vaccine
15-17 Weeks
Progress Exam
DHLPP/corona combo vaccine
Rabies (1 year)
Lyme vaccine (1st)
18-20 weeks

Lyme vaccine
(2nd booster)

Pet Identification card issued
6 months old 1st Heartworm test
Adult
Vaccination Protocol
Annual Boosters
Annual physical exam*
DHLPP/corona combo vaccine
Fecal analysis
Bordetella (every 6 months)
Heartworm test
Rabies (every 3 years)
Dental Exam
Lyme vaccine
Pet Identification card (updated)
Heartworm prevention

Distemper/parvo combo vaccine (DHLPP/corona)-

D- Canine distemper is a high mortality viral disease. It produces GI, respiratory and neurologic signs.

H- Infectious canine hepatitis infects the liver, kidneys, spleen and lungs. Death and chronic hepatitis may occur. This virus may survive outside the host for weeks to months.

L- Leptospirosis is a bacterial infection resulting from contact with infected wildlife, urine from infected dogs or contaminated food or water. This bacteria infects the liver and kidneys. LEPTOSPIROSIS CAN BE TRANSMITTED TO HUMANS BY CONTACT WITH BREAKS IN THE SKIN OR MUCOUS MEMBRANES.

LEPTOSPIROSIS CAN BE TRANSMITTED TO HUMANS BY CONTACT WITH BREAKS IN THE SKIN OR MUCOUS MEMBRANES. P- Canine parvovirus is very common! The most common signs are lethargy, vomiting and diarrhea. Unvaccinated puppies and young dogs are most commonly affected. Canine parvovirus is highly contagious and has a high mortality rate!

P- Canine parainfluenza is a contagious upper respiratory infection easily transmitted via air or direct contact. This disease can limit your dog’s activity and progress to pneumonia.

Coronavirus- Canine coronavirus is also seen in conjunction with parvovirus . The common clinical signs are lethargy, vomiting and diarrhea.
Bordetella vaccine- Bordetella Bronchiseptica (aka. “kennel cough”)is a bacteria that affects the respiratory tract. It is easily transmitted in the air or by direct contact. It can be transmitted anywhere, not just in kennels. If left untreated, it could progress to pneumonia and even death.
Rabies vaccine- Rabies is a viral disease that can affect all warm-blooded mammals (ie. dogs, cats, wildlife and humans). The virus infects the nervous system. Rabies is 100% fatal! All dogs, cats and ferrets must be vaccinated and kept current according to Virginia state law.
Lyme vaccine- Certain tick species carry and transmit the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. Lyme disease can affect many different organ systems and can become a chronic illness. Pfizer Inc.?Copyright 2003

**POST VACCINATION- Your pet may become drowsy for several hours following vaccination. If you notice extreme lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive salivation, swelling at the vaccination site (may occur a few days later), or most important-- swelling of the face, eyes, ears or muzzle--this must be addressed immediately (anaphylactic reaction) by your veterinarian or emergency clinic.

**All vaccinations and deworming should be performed by or under the direct supervision of a licensed veterinarian**

FELINE VACCINATION PROTOCOL

You should have your new pet examined by a licensed veterinarian as soon as he/she joins your family. On your first visit, the veterinarian will discuss the vaccinations and vaccination schedule, diet, heartworm and flea/tick prevention, litter box training, EVC and microchipping.

Vaccinations are a very important part of your pet’s life. Vaccines help to prevent potentially chronic or deadly illnesses.

Puppy Age
Vaccination Protocol
6-8 Weeks
Physical Exam
FVRCP combo vaccine
Fecal analysis
Deworming
Feline Leukemia test
1st Leukemia vaccine
Start flea prevention (8wks)
 
9-11 Weeks
Progress Exam
FVRCP combo vaccine
Fecal analysis
De-worming
Start heartworm prevention (8wks)
2nd Leukemia vaccine
12-14 Weeks
Progress Exam
FVRCP combo vaccine
Deworming
Rabies vaccine
Adult
Vaccination Protocol
Annual Boosters
Annual physical exam*
FVRCP combo vaccine
Fecal analysis
Feline Leukemia vaccine
Rabies

Dental Exam
Pet Identification card (updated)
Heartworm prevention

Feline distemper combo vaccine (FVRCP)-

FVR- Feline viral rhinotracheitis causes respiratory signs usually in kittens with no prior vaccination or exposure. Some cats can become persistently infected after returning to “normal” and continuously shed the virus during periods of stress.

C- Feline calicivirus causes respiratory signs usually in kittens with no prior vaccination or exposure. Clinical signs include fever, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, abdominal pain and neurological signs. Chlamydia psittaci is a bacteria that is not a common cause of feline respiratory disease.

P- Feline panleukopenia (“feline distemper”) is a highly contagious and often fatal disease. Clinical signs include fever, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, abdominal pain and neurological signs. Kittens without prior vaccination or exposure are most susceptible.

Feline Leukemia test & vaccine- Feline leukemia is a highly contagious viral disease which causes high mortality and affects multiple organs in the body. Any new kitten or cat to your home should be tested (and if negative) vaccinated for feline leukemia.

Feline AIDS (FIV) test & vaccine- FIV attacks the cat’s immune system, which develops into an immunodeficiency disease. This allows for chronic secondary and opportunistic infections. Any new kitten or cat to your home should be tested (and if negative) vaccinated for feline AIDS.
Rabies vaccine- Rabies is a viral disease that can affect all warm-blooded mammals (ie. dogs, cats, wildlife and humans). The virus infects the nervous system. Rabies is 100% fatal! All dogs, cats and ferrets must be vaccinated and kept current according to Virginia state law.
Pfizer Inc.?Copyright 2003

**POST VACCINATION Your pet may become drowsy for several hours following vaccination. If you notice extreme lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, hyper salivation, swelling at the vaccination site (may occur a few days later), or most important-- swelling of the face, eyes, ears or muzzle (anaphylactic reaction) --this must be addressed immediately by your veterinarian or emergency clinic.

**All vaccinations and deworming should be performed by or under the direct supervision of a licensed veterinarian**

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